So Very Savory

Jul. 19th, 2017 10:15 pm
dr_tectonic: (Mister Cranky-pants)
[personal profile] dr_tectonic
So I was gonna write up a rant about the Savery Savory Mushrooms water tower on Federal Blvd:



I was gonna rant about how the name is all wrong because "saver-y" is a lousy pun, and anyway it should be ordered "savory savery", and it's such a missed opportunity when they could have done "so very savory" instead, which has much better rhythm, and I was looking for a picture of it and I found the city's webpage about it and suddenly discovered that it's named for the guy who built the farm.

Mr. Charles William Savery.

Dammit! It's not lousy marketing at all, it's just a guy's name!

Which makes it a perfectly reasonable name.

Which totally torpedoes my rant. Harrumph.

Enlightenment apostasy

Jul. 15th, 2017 12:09 pm
dpolicar: (Default)
[personal profile] dpolicar
(A friend recently posted about feeling depressed at the extent to which people seem perfectly content to embrace beliefs about the world that fly in the face of our observations of it. This started out as a comment and got out of hand.)

Yeah, I hear that.

That said: I find it really helps me, when I'm disoriented in the way you describe, to remember that the Enlightenment is fairly recent, historically speaking.

The idea that we can arrive at accurate beliefs about the world by observing it, studying it, experimenting with it, taking careful records, making predictions and checking to see whether our predictions are accurate... that idea is just a few centuries old.

The idea that we can converge on beliefs about the world through that process...
That the same experiment can be expected to get the same result whether performed by Christians or Jews or Pagans or atheists, by conservatives or liberals, by materialists or spiritualists...
That the observable world itself can be the source of a set of shared self-reinforcing beliefs...
That reliance on that process can form the cornerstone of a community just as reliance on a set of stories about God that we inherited from our ancestors does...

...these are really new ideas, historically speaking. Our culture has not fully assimilated them, not even close. Most of us weren't raised in the community of believers in the process of observing our surroundings and reasoning about them rigorously and communicating about them reliably. We don't really have social practices that reinforce that process.

So, sure, we often reject it. We often stray from that path and return to the older practice of performing culturally endorsed beliefs about reality in order to reinforce group boundaries and affirm group loyalty without reference to a shared observational practice.

That's unsurprising. Humans have been doing that before we have records; probably since before we were recognizably human.

And the alternative is genuinely hard! And honestly, as community-centering practices go, it lacks a lot: it de-centers individuals, it doesn't directly address moral issues, it doesn't distinguish between emotionally satisfying and emotionally alienating claims, it doesn't speak to our fears about nonexistence and loneliness, etc.

The one thing it has going for it is a promise to converge on shared truths if followed assiduously.

And for a lot of us that just isn't enough, or isn't always enough. We may embrace the tangible benefits of the practice, the tools and medicines and crop yields and cherry-picked theories that reinforce our culturally endorsed beliefs, but we tend to reject the practice itself. Heck, even the thing we call "science" is riddled with those practices, like any other human institution. Those habits run deep.

So, sure, of course we continue to practice the old ways, choosing the practice of performing cultural beliefs despite contradictory observations over the practice of centering and converging on observable patterns in reality.

We will continue to do that for a long, long time. It's a natural consequence of being the sort of systems we are.

So anyway, as I say, remembering that helps me approach Enlightenment apostasy with compassion during periods where I start to fear it as the end of the world. And I find that helps.
dr_tectonic: (Default)
[personal profile] dr_tectonic
Let's see: I ran Star Wars on Saturday and the Jeff rolled ridiculously well on his observation check and noticed the stealthed Jedi in the room, so that plotline is going to advance a lot faster than I expected it to. Hooray for rolling with it!

Then on Sunday there was Unmunchkin at Neal's, and I got to play 5e DnD with a 9-year-old DM. Which was a lot of fun! And gave me a greater appreciation for boxed text. Also, my wild mage sorcerer got a wild surge the very first time he cast a spell in combat: confusion, 10' radius, centered on self. So that made me happy. :D

Last weekend I went up to Trevor's on Saturday afternoon and played board games. One was an interesting deckbuilder (Mystic Vale, I think?) with transparent cards that you slide into card sleeves to upgrade cards. It was neat, but I think it may have some unbalanced momentum issues with the accelerator cards. Then we played a round of Guillotine, which I hadn't played in ages.

On the 4th, there was a pool party at Bob & Pyro's in the afternoon, and then we did the usual fireworks-watching in Broomfield. I made Indian coleslaw for the pool party and promised the recipe to someone (Jason, I think), so here it is!

That recipe left me with extra mint in the fridge, so tonight I tried out a recipe for Thai spring rolls that was loitering my TRYME folder, rolling them up in lettuce leaves instead of rice paper. They were tasty, but the recipe was fussy, so I turned it into another coleslaw recipe.

Other than that, it's been all about wedding prep, which proceeds apace. Oh, and at lunch today the visiting grad student and I figured out how to science the thing she came here to figure out, and it turned out to be considerably easier than we originally expected. So that was pretty cool. Hooray for collaboration!



Indian Slaw (Bund Gobhi Nu Shaak)

Ingredients

1 bag coleslaw mix
1/4 cup dry-roasted peanuts
1/4 cup dry unsweetened coconut shreds (see tips)
1/4 cup finely chopped fresh cilantro leaves and tender stems
1 1/2 teaspoons coarse kosher or sea salt
Juice from 1 medium-size lime
2 tablespoons canola oil
1 teaspoon black or yellow mustard seeds
1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric

Preparation

Food-process peanuts to coarse bread crumb consistency. (Pulse to avoid turning them into peanut butter.)
Add peanuts, coconut, cilantro, salt, and lime juice to slaw mix.
Heat the oil in a small skillet over medium heat until shimmering.
Add mustard seeds, cover, and cook until seeds have stopped popping, 20 seconds or so.
Remove from the heat and add turmeric to the oil, swirling to mix.
Pour oil over the cabbage; grab some cabbage mix and wipe the pan clean.
Mix well and serve.



Thai Spring Roll Slaw

Ingredients

1/2 tsp garlic powder
3/2 Tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp molasses (heaping)
1 tsp Thai green curry paste
2 Tbsp fresh lime juice (juice of 1 medium lime)
2 Tbsp fish sauce

1/2+ cup mayonnaise

2 packages coleslaw mix
1 handful cilantro, chopped
1 handful mint, chopped

OPTIONAL:
1/3 pound rare deli roast beef, thinly sliced and cut into short 1/2-inch strips
-OR-
1 can of shrimp

Preparation

Mix the first six ingredients, then whisk mixture into mayonnaise.
Taste and add more mayo if needed for flavor or consistency
Toss the remaining ingredients in a large bowl.*
Add the sauce and mix until well-coated.

* The last two steps may need to be done in two batches.


NOTE: The original recipe uses roast beef as a substitute for shrimp, but I think shrimp would be lovely, especially if you don't have to fuss with wrapping spring rolls. I haven't tried it; 1 can is a total guess as to amount.

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